Before you buy

Be aware that this course is probably very different to other courses you may have experienced.

Please read carefully. Enrolments are not limited by seats, so there is no rush.

Other courses Our course
Able to cram and rush through
You absolutely cannot rush
Can skip lessons
Techniques build sequentially
Can do in your own style
Very clear guidelines to follow

Many of our techniques involve significant cognitive retraining. Not following the guidelines massively increases the risk of learning the techniques incorrectly and wasting time. Many students enter the course, read this, and choose to rush through anyway. Ironically, they all think “I’m different”. Inevitably, they all run into the same predictable mistakes. Our highly specific sequence and methodology for training proper learning processes are currently undergoing assessment for research publication.

To gain a proper understanding of what this course requires of you, please have a look at our Practice Predictor tool before purchasing.

A common reason for rushing the course is the belief that mastery of the entire course is necessary to be the most useful. This is completely false. Techniques from lesson 1 onwards can IMMEDIATELY be applied in real practice. This means that the moment you start the course, you can apply the techniques. Advanced techniques build directly on earlier techniques and rushing to advanced techniques too early causes unadvisable overwhelm.

If you believe the following statements, this course is not for you.

I can get good at a skill without taking time to practise it.

Rushing through and learning lots of techniques means I’ll be able to properly use all of the technique faster.

Once I understand something, that means I can apply and do it properly without practice.

Advanced techniques are better. I don’t need to waste time at fundamentals. I should go to advanced techniques first so I can improve faster!

I don’t need to waste time learning the basics because I’m already an excellent learner with lots of experience.

Knowing about a technique is enough. Even if I’m not using it in actual practice.